How to Write a Book for Young Children

There are different rules for writing a book, depending on your genre and target audience’s age. For young children from ages 2-8 years old, you should remember these top 10 suggestions for children’s book content: How to Write a Book for Young Children

  1. It’s not easy to be different, but it’s okay.
  2. You story needs heroes and villains, and the good guys should prevail over the bad.
  3. Your story must be clear and concise, and your world should be black or white.
  4. You should stick to one story so as not to confuse children.
  5. Characters must have their weaknesses and strong points.Its okay for stories to be scary, but they should not be traumatic to a child’s mind.
  6. Fun is important to children, but so is spelling and grammar. Be careful what you write, as children are learning their vocabulary from the stories they read.
  7. Fiction must be well-balanced. Magic, witch crafts or supernatural powers, for example, are okay as long as they’re logical within the context of the story.
  8. You should include lessons that kids can understand and use in their daily lives.
  9. Regular children can do extraordinary things, with or without assistance from adults.
  10. Write to inspire!

That’s it for today’s tips, but click here to learn more about publishing a children’s book that can motivate and inspire young minds.

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Posted in AuthorHouse Childrens Book, AuthorHouse US, Children, How to Write a Book for Children, Tips and Tricks
2 comments on “How to Write a Book for Young Children
  1. […] There are different rules for writing a book, depending on your genre and target audience’s age. For young children from ages 2-8 years old, you should remember these top 10 suggestions for childre…  […]

  2. […] Authors must always remember to answer the common questions when they illustrate a children’s book… Who is my audience? What are my illustrations trying to convey? Why illustrate this part of the story over another part? How should I illustrate it? […]

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